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Wildland Evolutions

CALIFORNIA INCIDENT COMMAND CERTIFICATION SYSTEM (CICCS)

CICCS was created in collaboration with the State Board of Fire Services to enhance firefighter safety and performance through a standardized certification system for all- risk management positions in the Incident command System.

The objective of CICCS is to create a qualification system that meets the needs of the California Fire Service. A single statewide system ensures a minimum standard is established for all personnel that are deployed to incidents outside of their home departments/agencies’ area of responsibility or jurisdiction.

All firefighters operating in the wildland fire environment must meet the minimum standards for their respective ICS position. This qualification is above and beyond the the training material which is contained in this manual. Click on the link below for more information on the California Incident Command Certification System


CHARACTERISTICS AND FUNCTIONS OF WILDLAND HOSE LAYS

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PROGRESSIVE HOSE LAY

Lesson Plan                                          Additional information

Progressive hose lays are used when mobile attack is not possible, and you have an adequate water supply to support the hose lay. This hose lay involves the laying of hose “progressively” while applying water along the fire’s perimeter in an effort to contain and control the fire.

Key operational points of progressive hose lays

  1. Organize the hose lay by assigning key responsibilities to individual Firefighters.
  2. Always operate from a safe anchor
  3. Hose lay speed is determined by the effort needed to achieve complete extinguishment and a secure line behind
  4. All personnel should be carrying hose in support of the hose lay

CHARACTERISTICS AND FUNCTIONS OF MOBILE ATTACK

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MOBILE ATTACK

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Mobile attack is a fast and efficient method of controlling wildland fires. In mobile attack the engine drives along the edge of the fire and a firefighter walk just ahead of the engine, extinguishing fire as they move.

Key operational points of mobile attack

  1. Firefighter(s) must manage hose to avoid hose being driven
  2. Driver must maintain visual contact with firefighters at all times, and stop when visibility is
  3. Speed is determined by the effort needed to achieve complete extinguishment and a secure line behind
  4. Firefighters should look for driving hazards ahead of the engine

STRUCTURE PROTECTION – ENGINE PREPARATION

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Engine preparation for structure protection involves setting up the engine with multiple hose lines that can be deployed and picked up quickly should the situation warrant it. Other tools and equipment can be prepared and made accessible for rapid deployment as the situation requires.

Key operational points for structure protection engine preparation

  1. Two hose lines hung from hooks or straps at the tailboard, connected to a common discharge is a typical
  2. An engine protection line should be readily
  3. Tools such as drip torches, bladder bags, and chain saws can be prepared and made available for deployment

STRUCTURE PROTECTION DEPLOYMENT

Lesson Plan  Additional Information

Fires burning in the Wildland Urban Interface present conditions that require special strategies and tactics. Often, companies are faced with numerous structures threatened with limited resources. This may require triage of structures, remaining mobile, and working with some independence while achieving the incident objectives.

Key operational points of structure protection in the WUI

  1. Be sure your crew and engine can survive a worst-case scenario at any structure you choose to stay and
  2. Remove fuels that can be easily ignited by fire brands within the home Ignition zone.
  3. Develop multiple plans to address tactic’s, communication, and Safety.

WUI SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS

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WILDLAND WATER SUPPLY

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Maintaining an adequate water supply while working in the wildland fire environment can be challenging. Fire hydrants may be non-existent which may require the use of water tenders, portable tanks, or drafting from static water sources. Effective water use and water conservation will make best use of the water supply you have.

Key operational points of Wildland Water Supply

  1. Order water tenders when operating in non-hydrant areas
  2. Make use of on site water sources such as garden hoses, swimming pools, ponds, etc. when available.
  3. When connecting to hydrants, use smaller hose (1 ½” or 2 ½”) that will not block roads and can be driven over if necessary
  4. Use class A foam if available to make what water you do have more effective.

HANDLINE CONSTRUCTION – HAND TOOL USE

Handline construction is an effective method of creating a fireline during both direct and indirect strategies. Handline is generally used when bulldozers are not available, or would be ineffective because slope, soil conditions, or use restrictions. There is a variety of hand tools used to construct handline. Some of the most common are; the Pulaski, McLeod, shovel, and rake.

Key operational points for Handline Construction and Hand Tool Use

  1. Be sure line location and specifications are known before starting
  2. Maintain a 10 foot spacing between firefighters when using hand tools
  3. Tools should be well maintained and sharp for maximum efficiency

HANDLINE CONSTRUCTION       

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WILDLAND HAND TOOLS        

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HAND TOOL MAINTENANCE      

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MOP UP         

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Mop up is the systematic removal of heat and other threats to a contained wildland fire. Mop up generally begins in area’s where the greatest threat to the line exists. Mop can be done with (wet) or without (dry) water. Mop up should be done in a systematic fashion where an area is gridded for hidden heat, potential rolling material, and snags that are a threat to the line.

Key operational points of Mop Up

  1. Develop a mop up plan with area’s of responsibility and mop up Specifications.
  2. Mop up will generally begin along the line and extend inward of the Burned ar.ea to a specific distance. 100% mop up means the entire Burned area.
  3. Use hand tools in conjunction with water for best results
  4. Use class A foam if available.

FIRE SHELTERS

Lesson Plan                        Additional Information

Your fire shelter is an aluminized tent offering protection by means of reflecting radiant heat and providing a volume of breathable air in a fire entrapment situation. Fire shelters should only be used in life-threatening situations, as a last resort. Practice deployment is part of our annual wildland fire refresher training.

Key operational points of using a Fire Shelter

  1. Try and choose a deployment site that is void of fuel and topographical Influences of convected air.
  2. Keeping your shelter sealed to the ground to avoid hot air from Entering.
  3. Take only your radio and water in the shelter
  4. Remain calm, do not leave your shelter until someone tells you to.

FIRE SHELTER DEPLOYMENT- STANDING          

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FIRE SHELTER DEPLOYMENT – LYING DOWN       

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